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Chime Players at PVE

Allow me to introduce you to the PVE Chime Players. Resident Phyllis Mosher has been the driving (or should that be chiming) force since the group formed in the beginning of 2013.

The players have rung chimes at Laurel Creek, Quail Creek and Sunday morning religious services in Rawlinson Hall, as well as during the Cultural Chorale presentations and at the Christmas tree-lighting ceremony. The group has also performed at the Fairfield Post-Acute facility.

Phyllis Mosher, director. LtoR: Janie MaƩ hews, Marie Smith, Liz Wildberger, Linda McCrory, Phyllis Riley, Catherine Van Eyck, Jan Heise, Ann Farber, Michele Rivard

Phyllis Mosher, director. LtoR: Janie Mathews, Marie Smith, Liz Wildberger, Linda
McCrory, Phyllis Riley, Catherine Van Eyck, Jan Heise, Ann Farber, Michele Rivard

What is a hand chime anyway?

It is a handheld instrument that resembles a tuning fork. Each is of a different size thus making the various tones of a musical scale. The player holds one in each hand and plays in turn according to the musical score. Melodies are played and harmonies are often added.

The forerunner to the hand chime came thousands of years ago in Southeast Asia and some parts of China. As workers were harvesting bamboo, they would occasionally cut a notch in a stalk. They realized that as each stalk fell and hit an object it made a different sound. Experimentation with the stalks (“tubes”) began. The first metal “slotted” tube was patented in 1900. More patents followed as improvements were made. Today, we enjoy tone chimes, also known as hand chimes—most commonly in religious services.

Phyllis reminds us that music is a wonderful therapy and is a good way to learn something new, which keeps our brains and spirits active. She invites residents to “give chimes a go.” No musical experience is required. The Chimes players rehearse every week.